Children’s Ateliers

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.

This nationally renowned daycare and nursery school program asked for the addition of first and second floor ateliers to their current home, a 19th century brick firehouse, in order to expand their project-based curriculum by creating space for children to pursue sustained art projects. Acting both as architect and construction manager for the project, we worked closely with school administrators, teachers, and Yale University’s Planning Department, to craft a building that could be produced within an extremely constrained site, budget, and construction schedule.

The design introduces a two-story addition to the converted firehouse, maximizing square footage and available daylight along a narrow side yard on the eastern exposure of the building, and providing well-lit rooms with exquisite views to the playing fields of an adjacent school with New Haven’s landmark East Rock as a backdrop.  The simple volume also provides an entry canopy and covered outdoor play area.  Although the design of the art rooms is highly integrated with the space and function of the existing teaching areas, we used construction-staging strategies to isolate construction and minimize its interface with the existing building, dramatically reducing the impact of new construction on school activities, which continued to serve sixty children throughout the construction period.