Firehouse 12 Music Studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Design Research

Thin Plywood Acoustical Shell for a Music Recording Studio and Performance Space

We solved the conflicting acoustical requirements of a small multi-use musical performance space by developing a continuous acoustic surface of plywood panels that could be adjusted to optimize its acoustical performance and achieve both the sound deadening requirements of a recording studio and the reverberant character of a music auditorium.

Using a system assembled from off-the-shelf hardware and standard-sized sheets of exterior grade plywood, we developed prototypes for an acoustical shell in our fabrication shop.  The resulting thin, continuous plywood shell warps to create the necessary acoustic conditions and characteristics in different areas of the room.  At its center, where the primary recording activity takes place, the thin shell would act as a low frequency sound absorber, eliminating the flutter often created in small rooms by loud low tones.  At the front of the room where a proscenium stage is formed, the plywood shell splits into narrow twisted filaments, which serve to diffuse and diffract acoustic reflections that might clutter the auditory experience of performing musicians.  In addition, the gaps between the strands and the space behinds it double as return air grill and plenum for the heating and ventilation of the room.

In order to determine the feasibility and functionality of the plywood shell, we tested the compound flexural capacity of AC grade plywood by suspending it from a test armature of evenly spaced threaded rods and then torquing the surface until it failed.  Once we had established the maximum flex possible in two axes, we used those measurements as design parameters for a digital model, which was then re-”drawn” as an acoustical model that simulated the acoustical reflections the compound curvature would produce.

By mounting the plywood shell as a continuous surface attached at regular intervals to threaded rods with adjustable couplings, the actual acoustical performance of the room could be tested in situ as well as computationally, and,  where necessary, re-calibrated with the plywood shell in place.  Before adding the final finish lamination of birch plywood, the shell and room was “tuned” by tightening and loosening the coupling nuts to produce optimal acoustic character.

Thin Plywood Acoustical Shell for a Music Recording Studio and Performance Space

We solved the conflicting acoustical requirements of a small multi-use musical performance space by developing a continuous acoustic surface of plywood panels that could be adjusted to optimize its acoustical performance and achieve both the sound deadening requirements of a recording studio and the reverberant character of a music auditorium.

Using a system assembled from off-the-shelf hardware and standard-sized sheets of exterior grade plywood, we developed prototypes for an acoustical shell in our fabrication shop.  The resulting thin, continuous plywood shell warps to create the necessary acoustic conditions and characteristics in different areas of the room.  At its center, where the primary recording activity takes place, the thin shell would act as a low frequency sound absorber, eliminating the flutter often created in small rooms by loud low tones.  At the front of the room where a proscenium stage is formed, the plywood shell splits into narrow twisted filaments, which serve to diffuse and diffract acoustic reflections that might clutter the auditory experience of performing musicians.  In addition, the gaps between the strands and the space behinds it double as return air grill and plenum for the heating and ventilation of the room.

In order to determine the feasibility and functionality of the plywood shell, we tested the compound flexural capacity of AC grade plywood by suspending it from a test armature of evenly spaced threaded rods and then torquing the surface until it failed.  Once we had established the maximum flex possible in two axes, we used those measurements as design parameters for a digital model, which was then re-”drawn” as an acoustical model that simulated the acoustical reflections the compound curvature would produce.

By mounting the plywood shell as a continuous surface attached at regular intervals to threaded rods with adjustable couplings, the actual acoustical performance of the room could be tested in situ as well as computationally, and,  where necessary, re-calibrated with the plywood shell in place.  Before adding the final finish lamination of birch plywood, the shell and room was “tuned” by tightening and loosening the coupling nuts to produce optimal acoustic character.

Thin Plywood Acoustical Shell for a Music Recording Studio and Performance Space

We solved the conflicting acoustical requirements of a small multi-use musical performance space by developing a continuous acoustic surface of plywood panels that could be adjusted to optimize its acoustical performance and achieve both the sound deadening requirements of a recording studio and the reverberant character of a music auditorium.

Using a system assembled from off-the-shelf hardware and standard-sized sheets of exterior grade plywood, we developed prototypes for an acoustical shell in our fabrication shop.  The resulting thin, continuous plywood shell warps to create the necessary acoustic conditions and characteristics in different areas of the room.  At its center, where the primary recording activity takes place, the thin shell would act as a low frequency sound absorber, eliminating the flutter often created in small rooms by loud low tones.  At the front of the room where a proscenium stage is formed, the plywood shell splits into narrow twisted filaments, which serve to diffuse and diffract acoustic reflections that might clutter the auditory experience of performing musicians.  In addition, the gaps between the strands and the space behinds it double as return air grill and plenum for the heating and ventilation of the room.

In order to determine the feasibility and functionality of the plywood shell, we tested the compound flexural capacity of AC grade plywood by suspending it from a test armature of evenly spaced threaded rods and then torquing the surface until it failed.  Once we had established the maximum flex possible in two axes, we used those measurements as design parameters for a digital model, which was then re-”drawn” as an acoustical model that simulated the acoustical reflections the compound curvature would produce.

By mounting the plywood shell as a continuous surface attached at regular intervals to threaded rods with adjustable couplings, the actual acoustical performance of the room could be tested in situ as well as computationally, and,  where necessary, re-calibrated with the plywood shell in place.  Before adding the final finish lamination of birch plywood, the shell and room was “tuned” by tightening and loosening the coupling nuts to produce optimal acoustic character.

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio

Working within the abandoned shell of an early 20th century fire station in New Haven’s historic 9th square district, we designed a commercial recording studio that doubles as a performance space.  Our client, committed to his venture’s role within the cultural life of the city, required this dual purpose “live room” in order to develop a performance series that greatly expands New Haven’s live music scene. The building also houses a bar and a two-bedroom apartment.  Our design approach highlights the integrity of the original building by adding discrete architectural elements that act in counterpoint to the brick shell.

A continuous plywood shell solves the conflicting acoustical requirements posed by the live room; at the back of the proscenium stage, the shell splits and distorts to act as a diffuser.  Above the primary recording area, it undulates to refract high frequency sound.  From the lobby, the plywood shell forms the exterior of the auditorium, providing a kind of internal “marquee” for the theater that wraps down to create the ceiling of the basement bar.  In the residence, another large birch shell arcs down from a skylight to reflect light into the depth of the room and to form a physical divider between the living room and bedrooms.  As these great curving planes of plywood weave through the interior, they add light and warmth to the once dark brick spaces of the firehouse.

We developed prototypes of material and assembly systems for the birch shell within our workshop, an approach which limited installation time within the building. The system included the ability to “tune” the shell to achieve optimum reverberation at different locations within the studio