Footbridge

Our client wished to cross to his property on the far bank of a ravine and brook and asked us to insert a path and bridge into this delicate ecosystem of wetland and second growth forest.  The difficult topography, limited access, and environmental sensitivity of the site led us to a solution for a bridge that would minimize its impact on the landscape during construction and into the future.

We conceived of the bridge as a continuation of the narrow access path that switchbacks across the steep grade from the client’s house and lawn.  The bridge is a slender, curving, 70-foot long plank of glue- and bolt-laminated southern yellow pine that spans from a natural gate formed by a large double tulip tree and an outcropping of ledge on the near bank.  A pair of stainless steel pipes on pin connections spring from available exposed ledge to create two mid-span supports as the bridge weaves to avoid existing trees on the stream’s banks.  The bridge deck lands on a beam that cantilevers from deep footings in the soft soil of the far bank, providing an overlook to views down the gorge to the south.  By raising the height and extending the length of the bridge, we kept the structure above high water levels and the abutments well back from the streambed.  The bridge is designed as a structurally monolithic slab, prefabricated off-site in six parallel glue-laminated S- shaped lengths of pressure treated timber, craned into position on temporary shoring and then clamped together by pre-drilled threaded rods.  In designing the bridge and planning its construction, we worked to minimize its environmental impact, avoiding the invasive excavation of forming and pouring concrete footings and piers and instead taking advantage of the ledge exposed by the erosion of the streambed to create structural foundations for the bridge.

The offsite prefabrication of nearly all components and their careful installation from staging areas outside of the wetland areas dramatically reduced assembly time and the heavy foot or machine traffic associated with more typical site-built projects.  Additionally, by confining the use of epoxy resin glues to assembly in the shop, employing low-V.O.C.-producing structural glues when working on site, and specifying arsenic- and chromium-free wood preservatives, we minimized the toxicity of the materials and products that would make up the bridge.  Our assembly plan mitigated the high labor costs of protracted work within a regulated wetland area: the skilled crew, well-versed in the assembly procedure, was able to deliver, install, and stabilize the bridge deck in one day.

Our client wished to cross to his property on the far bank of a ravine and brook and asked us to insert a path and bridge into this delicate ecosystem of wetland and second growth forest.  The difficult topography, limited access, and environmental sensitivity of the site led us to a solution for a bridge that would minimize its impact on the landscape during construction and into the future.

We conceived of the bridge as a continuation of the narrow access path that switchbacks across the steep grade from the client’s house and lawn.  The bridge is a slender, curving, 70-foot long plank of glue- and bolt-laminated southern yellow pine that spans from a natural gate formed by a large double tulip tree and an outcropping of ledge on the near bank.  A pair of stainless steel pipes on pin connections spring from available exposed ledge to create two mid-span supports as the bridge weaves to avoid existing trees on the stream’s banks.  The bridge deck lands on a beam that cantilevers from deep footings in the soft soil of the far bank, providing an overlook to views down the gorge to the south.  By raising the height and extending the length of the bridge, we kept the structure above high water levels and the abutments well back from the streambed.  The bridge is designed as a structurally monolithic slab, prefabricated off-site in six parallel glue-laminated S- shaped lengths of pressure treated timber, craned into position on temporary shoring and then clamped together by pre-drilled threaded rods.  In designing the bridge and planning its construction, we worked to minimize its environmental impact, avoiding the invasive excavation of forming and pouring concrete footings and piers and instead taking advantage of the ledge exposed by the erosion of the streambed to create structural foundations for the bridge.

The offsite prefabrication of nearly all components and their careful installation from staging areas outside of the wetland areas dramatically reduced assembly time and the heavy foot or machine traffic associated with more typical site-built projects.  Additionally, by confining the use of epoxy resin glues to assembly in the shop, employing low-V.O.C.-producing structural glues when working on site, and specifying arsenic- and chromium-free wood preservatives, we minimized the toxicity of the materials and products that would make up the bridge.  Our assembly plan mitigated the high labor costs of protracted work within a regulated wetland area: the skilled crew, well-versed in the assembly procedure, was able to deliver, install, and stabilize the bridge deck in one day.

Our client wished to cross to his property on the far bank of a ravine and brook and asked us to insert a path and bridge into this delicate ecosystem of wetland and second growth forest.  The difficult topography, limited access, and environmental sensitivity of the site led us to a solution for a bridge that would minimize its impact on the landscape during construction and into the future.

We conceived of the bridge as a continuation of the narrow access path that switchbacks across the steep grade from the client’s house and lawn.  The bridge is a slender, curving, 70-foot long plank of glue- and bolt-laminated southern yellow pine that spans from a natural gate formed by a large double tulip tree and an outcropping of ledge on the near bank.  A pair of stainless steel pipes on pin connections spring from available exposed ledge to create two mid-span supports as the bridge weaves to avoid existing trees on the stream’s banks.  The bridge deck lands on a beam that cantilevers from deep footings in the soft soil of the far bank, providing an overlook to views down the gorge to the south.  By raising the height and extending the length of the bridge, we kept the structure above high water levels and the abutments well back from the streambed.  The bridge is designed as a structurally monolithic slab, prefabricated off-site in six parallel glue-laminated S- shaped lengths of pressure treated timber, craned into position on temporary shoring and then clamped together by pre-drilled threaded rods.  In designing the bridge and planning its construction, we worked to minimize its environmental impact, avoiding the invasive excavation of forming and pouring concrete footings and piers and instead taking advantage of the ledge exposed by the erosion of the streambed to create structural foundations for the bridge.

The offsite prefabrication of nearly all components and their careful installation from staging areas outside of the wetland areas dramatically reduced assembly time and the heavy foot or machine traffic associated with more typical site-built projects.  Additionally, by confining the use of epoxy resin glues to assembly in the shop, employing low-V.O.C.-producing structural glues when working on site, and specifying arsenic- and chromium-free wood preservatives, we minimized the toxicity of the materials and products that would make up the bridge.  Our assembly plan mitigated the high labor costs of protracted work within a regulated wetland area: the skilled crew, well-versed in the assembly procedure, was able to deliver, install, and stabilize the bridge deck in one day.

Our client wished to cross to his property on the far bank of a ravine and brook and asked us to insert a path and bridge into this delicate ecosystem of wetland and second growth forest.  The difficult topography, limited access, and environmental sensitivity of the site led us to a solution for a bridge that would minimize its impact on the landscape during construction and into the future.

We conceived of the bridge as a continuation of the narrow access path that switchbacks across the steep grade from the client’s house and lawn.  The bridge is a slender, curving, 70-foot long plank of glue- and bolt-laminated southern yellow pine that spans from a natural gate formed by a large double tulip tree and an outcropping of ledge on the near bank.  A pair of stainless steel pipes on pin connections spring from available exposed ledge to create two mid-span supports as the bridge weaves to avoid existing trees on the stream’s banks.  The bridge deck lands on a beam that cantilevers from deep footings in the soft soil of the far bank, providing an overlook to views down the gorge to the south.  By raising the height and extending the length of the bridge, we kept the structure above high water levels and the abutments well back from the streambed.  The bridge is designed as a structurally monolithic slab, prefabricated off-site in six parallel glue-laminated S- shaped lengths of pressure treated timber, craned into position on temporary shoring and then clamped together by pre-drilled threaded rods.  In designing the bridge and planning its construction, we worked to minimize its environmental impact, avoiding the invasive excavation of forming and pouring concrete footings and piers and instead taking advantage of the ledge exposed by the erosion of the streambed to create structural foundations for the bridge.

The offsite prefabrication of nearly all components and their careful installation from staging areas outside of the wetland areas dramatically reduced assembly time and the heavy foot or machine traffic associated with more typical site-built projects.  Additionally, by confining the use of epoxy resin glues to assembly in the shop, employing low-V.O.C.-producing structural glues when working on site, and specifying arsenic- and chromium-free wood preservatives, we minimized the toxicity of the materials and products that would make up the bridge.  Our assembly plan mitigated the high labor costs of protracted work within a regulated wetland area: the skilled crew, well-versed in the assembly procedure, was able to deliver, install, and stabilize the bridge deck in one day.

Our client wished to cross to his property on the far bank of a ravine and brook and asked us to insert a path and bridge into this delicate ecosystem of wetland and second growth forest.  The difficult topography, limited access, and environmental sensitivity of the site led us to a solution for a bridge that would minimize its impact on the landscape during construction and into the future.

We conceived of the bridge as a continuation of the narrow access path that switchbacks across the steep grade from the client’s house and lawn.  The bridge is a slender, curving, 70-foot long plank of glue- and bolt-laminated southern yellow pine that spans from a natural gate formed by a large double tulip tree and an outcropping of ledge on the near bank.  A pair of stainless steel pipes on pin connections spring from available exposed ledge to create two mid-span supports as the bridge weaves to avoid existing trees on the stream’s banks.  The bridge deck lands on a beam that cantilevers from deep footings in the soft soil of the far bank, providing an overlook to views down the gorge to the south.  By raising the height and extending the length of the bridge, we kept the structure above high water levels and the abutments well back from the streambed.  The bridge is designed as a structurally monolithic slab, prefabricated off-site in six parallel glue-laminated S- shaped lengths of pressure treated timber, craned into position on temporary shoring and then clamped together by pre-drilled threaded rods.  In designing the bridge and planning its construction, we worked to minimize its environmental impact, avoiding the invasive excavation of forming and pouring concrete footings and piers and instead taking advantage of the ledge exposed by the erosion of the streambed to create structural foundations for the bridge.

The offsite prefabrication of nearly all components and their careful installation from staging areas outside of the wetland areas dramatically reduced assembly time and the heavy foot or machine traffic associated with more typical site-built projects.  Additionally, by confining the use of epoxy resin glues to assembly in the shop, employing low-V.O.C.-producing structural glues when working on site, and specifying arsenic- and chromium-free wood preservatives, we minimized the toxicity of the materials and products that would make up the bridge.  Our assembly plan mitigated the high labor costs of protracted work within a regulated wetland area: the skilled crew, well-versed in the assembly procedure, was able to deliver, install, and stabilize the bridge deck in one day.

Our client wished to cross to his property on the far bank of a ravine and brook and asked us to insert a path and bridge into this delicate ecosystem of wetland and second growth forest.  The difficult topography, limited access, and environmental sensitivity of the site led us to a solution for a bridge that would minimize its impact on the landscape during construction and into the future.

We conceived of the bridge as a continuation of the narrow access path that switchbacks across the steep grade from the client’s house and lawn.  The bridge is a slender, curving, 70-foot long plank of glue- and bolt-laminated southern yellow pine that spans from a natural gate formed by a large double tulip tree and an outcropping of ledge on the near bank.  A pair of stainless steel pipes on pin connections spring from available exposed ledge to create two mid-span supports as the bridge weaves to avoid existing trees on the stream’s banks.  The bridge deck lands on a beam that cantilevers from deep footings in the soft soil of the far bank, providing an overlook to views down the gorge to the south.  By raising the height and extending the length of the bridge, we kept the structure above high water levels and the abutments well back from the streambed.  The bridge is designed as a structurally monolithic slab, prefabricated off-site in six parallel glue-laminated S- shaped lengths of pressure treated timber, craned into position on temporary shoring and then clamped together by pre-drilled threaded rods.  In designing the bridge and planning its construction, we worked to minimize its environmental impact, avoiding the invasive excavation of forming and pouring concrete footings and piers and instead taking advantage of the ledge exposed by the erosion of the streambed to create structural foundations for the bridge.

The offsite prefabrication of nearly all components and their careful installation from staging areas outside of the wetland areas dramatically reduced assembly time and the heavy foot or machine traffic associated with more typical site-built projects.  Additionally, by confining the use of epoxy resin glues to assembly in the shop, employing low-V.O.C.-producing structural glues when working on site, and specifying arsenic- and chromium-free wood preservatives, we minimized the toxicity of the materials and products that would make up the bridge.  Our assembly plan mitigated the high labor costs of protracted work within a regulated wetland area: the skilled crew, well-versed in the assembly procedure, was able to deliver, install, and stabilize the bridge deck in one day.

Our client wished to cross to his property on the far bank of a ravine and brook and asked us to insert a path and bridge into this delicate ecosystem of wetland and second growth forest.  The difficult topography, limited access, and environmental sensitivity of the site led us to a solution for a bridge that would minimize its impact on the landscape during construction and into the future.

We conceived of the bridge as a continuation of the narrow access path that switchbacks across the steep grade from the client’s house and lawn.  The bridge is a slender, curving, 70-foot long plank of glue- and bolt-laminated southern yellow pine that spans from a natural gate formed by a large double tulip tree and an outcropping of ledge on the near bank.  A pair of stainless steel pipes on pin connections spring from available exposed ledge to create two mid-span supports as the bridge weaves to avoid existing trees on the stream’s banks.  The bridge deck lands on a beam that cantilevers from deep footings in the soft soil of the far bank, providing an overlook to views down the gorge to the south.  By raising the height and extending the length of the bridge, we kept the structure above high water levels and the abutments well back from the streambed.  The bridge is designed as a structurally monolithic slab, prefabricated off-site in six parallel glue-laminated S- shaped lengths of pressure treated timber, craned into position on temporary shoring and then clamped together by pre-drilled threaded rods.  In designing the bridge and planning its construction, we worked to minimize its environmental impact, avoiding the invasive excavation of forming and pouring concrete footings and piers and instead taking advantage of the ledge exposed by the erosion of the streambed to create structural foundations for the bridge.

The offsite prefabrication of nearly all components and their careful installation from staging areas outside of the wetland areas dramatically reduced assembly time and the heavy foot or machine traffic associated with more typical site-built projects.  Additionally, by confining the use of epoxy resin glues to assembly in the shop, employing low-V.O.C.-producing structural glues when working on site, and specifying arsenic- and chromium-free wood preservatives, we minimized the toxicity of the materials and products that would make up the bridge.  Our assembly plan mitigated the high labor costs of protracted work within a regulated wetland area: the skilled crew, well-versed in the assembly procedure, was able to deliver, install, and stabilize the bridge deck in one day.