GOA Studio

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.

Our studio in New Haven occupies an early 20th century warehouse in the city’s historic 9th Square.  A once-thriving industrial district left to neglect and disrepair, the neighborhood’s stock of masonry and cast iron factory and warehouse buildings are lately finding new lives and uses.  By the time we moved to 35 Crown Street, the building had undergone numerous mid-century alterations.  Its original storefront had been replaced with an aluminum and masonite panel vitrine.  Its basic structure of brick party walls, heavy timber framing and decking were intact but buried under successive decaying layers of plaster, drywall, and pressboard “paneling.”

Our design of our workspace had three goals: to remove the extraneous layers that had been added to warehouse’s open space and thereby expose the beauty and simplicity of the original structural elements; to add a minimum of enclosed, discrete program elements that are independent of the building’s brick surfaces; to draw daylight deep into the interior of the long narrow space.

The new storefront provides views to an exhibition space, while access for deliveries to our workshop takes place via a large overhead door, often left open during good weather. Architects’ workstations and the library occupy the upper floors.  We cut open a section of the third floor deck and the roof above it, adding clerestory windows to bathe the spaces below with diffuse light. We usually work without electric lighting, thanks to the even daylight that washes the office. All work areas open to this central space, providing a very direct means of communication throughout the office.  The new section of roof, its underside sheathed in maple boards, forms a hyperbolic paraboloid surface that reflects light as it washes across the belly of the curve.