Lanterns

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Design Research

Prefabrication of Translucent Enclosures and Pre-tensioned Wooden Screens

A foreshortened and demanding schedule combined with a congested site in which excavation, concrete work, and final landscape installation were to be undertaken in tight sequence left little room for a conventional design and construction process with its methodical sequence of proposal and review.  Instead, working closely with landscape contractor Christiansen Landscaping, Gray Organschi Architecture and in-house fabrication firm JIG designbuild developed a compressed and overlapping process of design, detailing, fabrication and installation of the major architectural components of the garden: four prefabricated enclosures which doubled as large lounge furniture and light boxes.  Before ground was broken on the project, the construction of finished modules was underway in our workshop. In shuffling the typically linear sequence of construction, we relied on the careful tracking of interdependent components that we developed and produced separately but simultaneously.  Team members were in constant contact to verify assumptions, test tolerances, and double-check fit.

In the main shop, we fabricated the “C”-shaped moment frames that provided structure for each box and then sheathed them in Atlantic White Cedar.  The dimension of these “boxes” we derived from maximum allowable trucking dimensions on Interstate Highways, without needing to obtain oversize freight permits.  At the same time, in a ground floor workspace adjacent to our shop, we set up jigs to mass-produce the cedar screens that would enclose the light-boxes during the winter, a network of fine cedar slats, put under tension and warped by spacers placed in alternating positions throughout the system to create a taut but flexible surface. Using electric drills with special chucks, we spun a series of nylon micro-threaded rods through the system of spacers and slats, connecting them to the welded aluminum frames that border each panel.  We kept the light gauge aluminum angles from buckling under load by requiring a translucent backup panel of extruded polycarbonate to do double duty:  to serve as a light-emitting weatherproofing layer and to keep the undersized aluminum angles true and in plane.

We developed this pre-tensioned system from previous experiments with open flexible wooden screens in a project for a beach side changing room (see Cabana) and from our structural experiments with a timber “net” in our design for the Mill River Canopy that was part of a wetland remediation project in Stamford, Connecticut.  By working on a similar structural and methodological problem at vastly different scales, we found that the principles of wood bending, post-tensioning, and repetitive assembly could be applied to similar problems in varying contexts.

We installed the garden enclosures and screens on an “as-needed” basis, placing them as the final landscape finishes of bluestone paving and sod were unrolled across the site.  The tight construction sequence we were able to develop relied on steady communication with trusted collaborators in the landscaping, plumbing, and electrical trades, enabling us to back out of the site with the project substantially complete and operational in a little more than three months.


Prefabrication of Translucent Enclosures and Pre-tensioned Wooden Screens

A foreshortened and demanding schedule combined with a congested site in which excavation, concrete work, and final landscape installation were to be undertaken in tight sequence left little room for a conventional design and construction process with its methodical sequence of proposal and review.  Instead, working closely with landscape contractor Christiansen Landscaping, Gray Organschi Architecture and in-house fabrication firm JIG designbuild developed a compressed and overlapping process of design, detailing, fabrication and installation of the major architectural components of the garden: four prefabricated enclosures which doubled as large lounge furniture and light boxes.  Before ground was broken on the project, the construction of finished modules was underway in our workshop. In shuffling the typically linear sequence of construction, we relied on the careful tracking of interdependent components that we developed and produced separately but simultaneously.  Team members were in constant contact to verify assumptions, test tolerances, and double-check fit.

In the main shop, we fabricated the “C”-shaped moment frames that provided structure for each box and then sheathed them in Atlantic White Cedar.  The dimension of these “boxes” we derived from maximum allowable trucking dimensions on Interstate Highways, without needing to obtain oversize freight permits.  At the same time, in a ground floor workspace adjacent to our shop, we set up jigs to mass-produce the cedar screens that would enclose the light-boxes during the winter, a network of fine cedar slats, put under tension and warped by spacers placed in alternating positions throughout the system to create a taut but flexible surface. Using electric drills with special chucks, we spun a series of nylon micro-threaded rods through the system of spacers and slats, connecting them to the welded aluminum frames that border each panel.  We kept the light gauge aluminum angles from buckling under load by requiring a translucent backup panel of extruded polycarbonate to do double duty:  to serve as a light-emitting weatherproofing layer and to keep the undersized aluminum angles true and in plane.

We developed this pre-tensioned system from previous experiments with open flexible wooden screens in a project for a beach side changing room (see Cabana) and from our structural experiments with a timber “net” in our design for the Mill River Canopy that was part of a wetland remediation project in Stamford, Connecticut.  By working on a similar structural and methodological problem at vastly different scales, we found that the principles of wood bending, post-tensioning, and repetitive assembly could be applied to similar problems in varying contexts.

We installed the garden enclosures and screens on an “as-needed” basis, placing them as the final landscape finishes of bluestone paving and sod were unrolled across the site.  The tight construction sequence we were able to develop relied on steady communication with trusted collaborators in the landscaping, plumbing, and electrical trades, enabling us to back out of the site with the project substantially complete and operational in a little more than three months.


Prefabrication of Translucent Enclosures and Pre-tensioned Wooden Screens

A foreshortened and demanding schedule combined with a congested site in which excavation, concrete work, and final landscape installation were to be undertaken in tight sequence left little room for a conventional design and construction process with its methodical sequence of proposal and review.  Instead, working closely with landscape contractor Christiansen Landscaping, Gray Organschi Architecture and in-house fabrication firm JIG designbuild developed a compressed and overlapping process of design, detailing, fabrication and installation of the major architectural components of the garden: four prefabricated enclosures which doubled as large lounge furniture and light boxes.  Before ground was broken on the project, the construction of finished modules was underway in our workshop. In shuffling the typically linear sequence of construction, we relied on the careful tracking of interdependent components that we developed and produced separately but simultaneously.  Team members were in constant contact to verify assumptions, test tolerances, and double-check fit.

In the main shop, we fabricated the “C”-shaped moment frames that provided structure for each box and then sheathed them in Atlantic White Cedar.  The dimension of these “boxes” we derived from maximum allowable trucking dimensions on Interstate Highways, without needing to obtain oversize freight permits.  At the same time, in a ground floor workspace adjacent to our shop, we set up jigs to mass-produce the cedar screens that would enclose the light-boxes during the winter, a network of fine cedar slats, put under tension and warped by spacers placed in alternating positions throughout the system to create a taut but flexible surface. Using electric drills with special chucks, we spun a series of nylon micro-threaded rods through the system of spacers and slats, connecting them to the welded aluminum frames that border each panel.  We kept the light gauge aluminum angles from buckling under load by requiring a translucent backup panel of extruded polycarbonate to do double duty:  to serve as a light-emitting weatherproofing layer and to keep the undersized aluminum angles true and in plane.

We developed this pre-tensioned system from previous experiments with open flexible wooden screens in a project for a beach side changing room (see Cabana) and from our structural experiments with a timber “net” in our design for the Mill River Canopy that was part of a wetland remediation project in Stamford, Connecticut.  By working on a similar structural and methodological problem at vastly different scales, we found that the principles of wood bending, post-tensioning, and repetitive assembly could be applied to similar problems in varying contexts.

We installed the garden enclosures and screens on an “as-needed” basis, placing them as the final landscape finishes of bluestone paving and sod were unrolled across the site.  The tight construction sequence we were able to develop relied on steady communication with trusted collaborators in the landscaping, plumbing, and electrical trades, enabling us to back out of the site with the project substantially complete and operational in a little more than three months.


Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.

Working in close collaboration with landscape architect Gary Hilderbrand, we developed the design of a group of garden pavilions with operable shade canopy for a garden in suburban Connecticut.  The buildings take their position from paving patterns that surround an existing pool: stone bands interrupted by wide grass joints, their rhythm and geometry projecting into the topography of the surrounding landscape.  We conceived of these structures as simple sculptural volumes that would change in form and program with the season: during warm-weather months, the small buildings open to create enormous roofed sofas beneath a pleated and folded cloth canopy strung on a high-tension aircraft cable trellis; in the winter, screens made from a lattice of white cedar laminated with an internal layer of translucent polycarbonate enclose the containers for the storage of garden furniture.  Lit from within, the boxes transform into lanterns in the winter landscape, austere free-standing lamps that echo their function in warmer weather and the promise of summer months to come.

In response to the constraints of a congested site and a tight schedule, we dramatically compressed the on-site work on the buildings and canopy by pre-fabricating the building components in our workshop in New Haven.  Installed quickly and with minimal impact as finished modular components in the final stage of landscape construction, the reversal of the conventional construction sequence allowed the garden to be completed and functional for use during the summer.