Ecological Living Module (ELM)

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.

The Ecological Living Module (ELM) is designed to demonstrate strategies for residential construction that meet the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) while providing high-quality, efficient, and flexible housing.  Developed in partnership with the Yale Center for Ecosystems in Architecture (CEA) and UN Environment, the ELM is a 22 square meter home designed to be adaptable, efficient, and multi-functional.  Capable of accommodating up to four people, the ELM can readily transition from domestic to commercial and retail uses in response to various urban and cultural contexts. Constructed from renewable, bio-based materials and featuring an array of passive and active sustainable environmental management systems, the design team sought to limit the energy and resources required to produce and operate the ELM over its lifetime.

Able to function completely independent of existing utilities and infrastructure, the ELM is an example of flexible, resilient, and sustainable design principles optimized for a specific climate, geography, and cultural context; in this case, the Northeast United States. A symbiotic array of passive and active environmental systems work in tandem with the ELM's architectural design to address the residents' needs for energy, water, food, and shelter. In future iterations, the ELM's design will adapt to address the particular, site-specific needs of the community and the climate, producing an innovative housing typology that responds to its context through both its architectural design and its environmental systems.

For residential construction and urban development, the ELM's reduced carbon footprint and off-grid systems address a number of issues critical to global sustainable development goals: reduced energy needs limit the financial resources necessary to produce housing, renewable bio-based materials preserve rural landscapes and finite resources, and - if aggregated at a global scale - low-carbon residential development has the potential to dramatically reduce the effects of climate change.

The first ELM will be installed on the United Nations Plaza in New York City from July 9th to July 18th during the 2018 High-Level Political Forum, and will remain open to the public at the UN Plaza until August 25th, 2018. Future iterations of the ELM will respond to the wide range of climatic and cultural contexts addressed by the United Nations and its partner countries and institutions.